Why did India’s elite choose to go for yoga over a football?

Why did India’s elite choose to go for yoga over a football?

The elite sports people are not all like that, say researchers.

A new study suggests elite Indian sportspeople are taking yoga seriously.

The authors say elite athletes like India’s world-class tennis player Rahul Dhar, cricket legend Sachin Tendulkar and rugby player Richie McCaw, as well as the likes of former NBA player Chris Bosh, have all embraced yoga as a form of self-improvement.

Their popularity in the Indian elite, and in their own communities, suggests they are not just looking for a little extra practice time, they are also interested in developing and developing as a whole, the authors write in their study, published in the Journal of Sport Sciences.

There is also growing interest in yoga among elite athletes in the US, China, Brazil and elsewhere.

But, for now, the study says the emphasis of the Indian sport community is on their sport, not on yoga.

“A lot of the elite athletes that are doing yoga are practicing it as an academic discipline,” said Dr Rishi K. Thakur, an associate professor of psychology at New York University and author of Yoga for Athletes.

Yoga is not just a form that has some benefit, he added.

If you are going to study it, you should study it seriously.

It is not only a form, it is a lifestyle.

Dr. Rishi Thakru, associate professor, psychology at NYU and author.

It’s a good exercise, but it is also a great way to train your mind and body.

Dr Thakuri said it is important to understand the benefits of yoga, and to avoid distractions.

He said sportspeople should avoid overdoing it.

“It’s really important to keep your body in good condition, so you can concentrate on your body and not on the mental state of your mind,” he said.

“You have to take care of your body.

If you are practicing too much, you can also affect your brain.”

Dr. Tharur added yoga was important for athletes, too.

In the study, researchers looked at how yoga-related sportspeople would feel and behave over a six-month period, asking how the exercise affected their physical health.

They also asked participants to describe how they felt on various yoga and exercise scales.

They also asked the participants to report how often they engaged in yoga.

Results showed elite sportspeople were at greater risk of poor mental health, and the researchers found the same to be true for yoga-oriented athletes.

For example, the participants reported being more anxious, feeling less positive and having less satisfaction with their daily lives, than non-athletes.

However, the athletes did not have a significant effect on their mental health.

“This is one area where yoga is not really that different from other exercise programs, so I think it’s really good to not think too much about that,” said Chiranjan Gopal, an assistant professor of sociology at New Delhi’s Jawaharlal Nehru University and co-author of The Yoga Cure: Yoga for a Healthy Life.

“Yoga really does have some benefits, but you have to make sure that the benefits are actually being taken care of.”

Dr. Gopal said the study has a clear message.

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