How to keep the peace in India after the NDTV assassination

How to keep the peace in India after the NDTV assassination

The NDTV news channel in India has been attacked and set on fire by suspected communist sympathisers who claim to be members of the communist party.

The group, known as the Red Army Faction, say they are against “a fascist regime”.

The Indian government has declared an emergency, and the Indian army has stepped up security measures in the countrys capital.

Here are some of the facts to know.

1.

The NDtv is a government-owned news channel, and is not run by a government official.

It is run by former news anchor Rajdeep Sardesai, who resigned from the channel last month, and by its editor-in-chief, Ritu Deo.

The channel has been owned by the government since 2013.

2.

NDTV has a circulation of around 25 million, and has been in existence since 2013, when the channel launched its daily news show, The Agenda, on a pay-per-view basis.

3.

The Red Army faction, which claims to be a part of the Indian communist party, says it is anti-fascist and seeks to establish a new, democratic India.

4.

It has claimed responsibility for the assassination of Rajdeep and Ritu, and for the violent attacks against journalists and others who have challenged the government.

5.

The attack on NDTV comes on the heels of a string of similar incidents across India.

Earlier this month, a man in Bengaluru, who has been charged with the murder of an Indian journalist, allegedly stabbed a reporter in his apartment, while another man in Ahmedabad was arrested for attacking a woman who had come to visit him.

In January, a police officer was stabbed to death in Hyderabad, India’s second city, by a mob of pro-India protesters.

The violence has been particularly intense in the past few months, with the number of people killed rising sharply in recent months, according to the United Nations.

6.

Indian police say they have identified at least eight people in connection with the recent attacks, including two of those who were arrested last month.

7.

The suspected assailants were detained in connection to the assassination attempt on the channel, but have not been named.

8.

A member of the Red Arm Faction told The Associated Press news agency that the group wanted to attack the news channel because it “will help create a fascist regime.”

The group said that its aim was to “free the world from a fascist dictatorship and bring about a new era in which all countries will be free of fascism”.

The Red Arm faction said it had planned to target NDTV headquarters in Bengal, and that the attacks would continue until the channel was shut down.

9.

The Indian state has announced a nationwide lockdown for several hours to prevent the threat of a third such attack.

But it did not elaborate on how the lockdown would be enforced.

10.

NDtv was forced to change its news content and editorial policy last month after it was reported that it had been edited out of several news stories.

A spokesman for the channel said the decision to remove NDTV content was made after the editorial board requested it to.

ND TV has apologised to all those who had their views taken out of their stories, and said that it would continue to provide impartial, independent and non-partisan news coverage.

11.

The attacks on NDtv have been condemned by some of India’s leading civil society organisations.

A group of lawyers from the NGO Code Pink has demanded an immediate end to the violence, and a probe into the alleged attacks.

12.

The government has blamed the media for instigating violence in India and has pledged to crack down on the group.

But many experts say the government is failing to enforce its own laws.

13.

The police have not yet identified any of the suspects.

admin

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