When Joe Greene dies, the antelope greens will survive

When Joe Greene dies, the antelope greens will survive

Joe Greene’s antelope green is set to survive the fall, but the animals that depend on the greens for food will have to find another source of food, a new report says.

The report, commissioned by the U.S. Forest Service and published by the University of Arizona, is the latest in a series of studies that show that a loss of greenland habitat can be devastating to antelope and antelope species.

The researchers say the loss of land for grazing and timber production is a key driver of the decline of the species.

But in a statement released Monday, the agency said that if current trends continue, the land could become unusable for grazing by 2050.

A lot of the land that is left is for grazing land and it’s the people who take care of it that are going to have to do it, the statement said.

The study predicts that the antelopes will lose 75 percent of their antelope habitat by the end of the century, and that the number of elk will decline by 50 percent.

The loss of habitat for grazing will be particularly acute in central Arizona, which accounts for about 30 percent of the nation’s anteloped populations.

The scientists found that the area where antelope live is losing more than half its antelope.

For example, the researchers estimate that more than a quarter of the antels living in western Utah were killed by cattle or horses in the past 50 years.

The species has declined by about 35 percent since it first became a federally endangered species in 1976, and habitat loss and overgrazing is also contributing to the loss.

A new study has also found that a small herd of antelope goats and cattle have grown up on some parts of the Uintah National Forest in western Idaho and Wyoming.

The Uintas have long been considered the most threatened and exploited species in the western U.K. They were designated as “species at risk” by the Endangered Species Act and the United States Forest Service in 2009.

They are also the first antelope-wildlife pair in the U-District.

They can be found in eastern Washington, as well as in Montana and Utah.

In 2010, the Uins were moved to the western Idaho National Forest, which is about 50 miles north of Boise.

The animals are also on the endangered species list in Utah.

A study last year found that antelope numbers in the Western Great Basin are at their lowest level in more than 30 years.

But conservationists say the species is not endangered, and they are optimistic about the future.

“The future of the Western antelope is in their hands,” said Tom McKeown, conservation director for the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

“They have a lot of work to do.”

The study found that one-quarter of the habitat that antelopes rely on for food, such as grassland and water, will become unusuable by the 2030s.

The remaining 80 percent will become grassland or forest, and less than half of the remaining forest habitat will be suitable for anteloping.

In fact, it’s possible that the forest could become a major problem for the animals as well.

“We’re not talking about one-tenth of the current forest in the Great Basin, we’re talking about two-thirds of the existing forest,” said McKeon.

“That means you’re going to see a lot more antelope disappearing from this area.”

McKeony said there’s a lot at stake in this area because there’s only about 50,000 acres of forest in Idaho, and he said the antelems are threatened by the loss there.

The forests are a big part of the wildlife for the species, and it could be one of the main reasons that it hasn’t recovered, McKeone said.

____Follow Emily Kelleher at www.facebook.com/emilykelleherAP.

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